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Phone: 515.462.2101
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Mail: P.O. Box 350, Winterset, IA, 50273
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Wednesday, August 27, 2014
Top Stories
WEEKEND LOUD PARTY DRAWS COMPLAINTS
 Several St. Charles residents approached Madison County Supervisors Tuesday about a weekend rave party at the St. Charles events center which was seemingly never ending, running from Friday through Sunday.
 “It was the first time they’ve had an event like that,” St. Charles city councilman and mayor pro-tem Lee Gray told supervisors.
 The party drew numerous calls to the Madison County Sheriff’s department about the noise levels. Although a deputy was dispatched to the party, noise levels subsided somewhat “for about an hour” and then slowly increased.
IN MEMORY: FLOWER ENTHUSIAST WALTZ DECIDES TO GIVE FLOWER SHOP A TRY
 A familiar face from the Winterset Shopper, Deb Waltz has taken a fresh step out on her own to do something she has been dreaming about for years.
 Named Forget Me Not Flowers and Gifts, the shop will be opened sometime next month to honor the memory of her teen son, Logan, who was involved in a tragic and untimely traffic accident.
 “Logan loved my work and wanted me to do this.”
 It is with his memory etched on her heart that she has found to courage to finally take the leap into business ownership.
 Located at 112 E. Court Ave., the former pawn shop has been painted and transformed into what Waltz calls and country, rustic-style floral shop.
CANDIDATES FILE PAPERS FOR OFFICE
 The deadline to file for elected office for the November election is today (Wednesday), but a number of candidates already have filed papers for the county extension, the Madison County Hospital board of trustees and the county soil commission.

Extension has 6 candidates
 There will be six candidates on the ballot for the county extension office this year, one for each of the five four-year terms, and one term where a two-year term is to be determined.
 Three members who had been serving on the extension council have opted not to file for re-election. They include county auditor Heidi Burhans, Rick Hildreth and Jill Lange.
COUNTY RECRUITED TO JOIN SKILLED IOWA, HOME-BASED IOWA PROGRAMS
 Madison County officials were courted Tuesday, and encouraged to join a pair of projects introduced by the governor’s office and the Iowa Workforce Development office.
 Marlys Jones of the Iowa Workforce Development office asked county officials to be among the growing number of Iowa counties who have joined the Skilled Iowa program.
 Madison County would be the 77th county to join the program if officials opt in.
SCHOOL IMPROVEMENTS GREET STUDENTS IN NEW SCHOOL YEAR
 As school gets under way in Winterset, parents, staff and students will all notice some changes on the various school campuses.
 Some things remain the same, like the late start Wednesdays, which begin this week. Otherwise, some of the changes will be noticeable, others not.
 Building and ground superintendent Randy Jeffs says the school district spent a lot of money this summer fixing things up. 
 Among the noticeable things:
LOCAL STUDENT GROUP RETURNS FROM JAPAN WITH NEW FRIENDS, MEMORIES
 22 years ago the city of Winterset formed a friendship exchange with the city of Shirane in Japan. Like pen pals share letters, this traveling exchange “trades” students – one year Winterset youth visit Japan, the next Japanese youth visit Winterset.
 The friendship exchange was made official in a 1999 visit to Japan, when then-mayor Jerry Schwertfeger signed an agreement with the mayor of Shirane.
 For over two decades groups of middle school students have been cultivating a relationship with Japanese students of the same age in a multi-year planning program to ultimately prepare the students to visit each other in their respective homes, garnering a taste for a new and very different culture.
COUNTY TO SHARE DRIVER’S LICENSE EXAMINER WITH DALLAS COUNTY
 Madison County will share a driver’s license examiner with neighboring Dallas County for the next several months.
 Madison County driver’s license examiner Diane Sawyers has quit her part time position with the county to take a full time position with Warren County as motor vehicle clerk.
PUBLIC HEALTH NURSE RESIGNS
 Madison County Public Health Nurse Jackie Howard is leaving – for Alaska.
 Howard and her husband, Terry, are planning a move to Alaska, where Jackie will work as a public health nurse in the borough of Tok – about 6.5 hours northeast of Anchorage, or about 3.5 hours from Fairbanks.
COUNTY TO FIND VEHICLE FOR VETERAN TRANSPORTS
 County supervisors were urged Tuesday to find a van that the county veteran’s affairs department could use to transport veterans back and forth from the VA hospital.
 The suggestion was made at the supervisors’ regular meeting, citing both Warren and Clarke counties provide similar free services.
 Officials were told the county could probably lease a vehicle from the state or federal government, and pay for mileage and meals for a driver.
CITYWIDE GARAGE SALE APPROACHES
 The annual fall citywide garage sale is just a few days away, as Saturday, Sept. 6, is the designated day for the Winterset event.
 Individuals who plan to hold a sale are encouraged to register their sale with the Shopper-Madisonian office to reserve a space on the map that will be published in next week’s edition of the papers.
 The deadline to reserve a slot on the map is Friday, due to the Labor Day holiday.
 Contact the Shopper office at 515-462-1535 for more information.
NEON SIGN GETS A SECOND CHANCE
 It was 1884. Miles Young Sr. started a seed business that would last over 100 years. He called it M. Young & Co. and advertised sales of grain, coal, feed and seed.
 It must have been a lucrative business. With a history of 103 years behind its name, it continued operation until 1997 when it was finally closed.
 By that time, Miles Young Sr. had long passed his business on to Miles Young III and his brother Blair. What was originally located on the east end of town made three moves. Once to the current Brittain Auto Parts location and then to its final spot that the Subway restaurant now occupies.
“CARE BEAR” FUNDRAISER TO HELP AMPUTEE HEAL
 On Feb. 20, 2014, Jason Carey, his wife, Jessica Carey, and their daughter, Josie, set off to Winterset from their home in Earlham to get groceries before a winter storm was to hit.
 Their son, Jacob, was in school that day.
 As they were headed home on the Highway 92 bypass, their vehicle slid on ice, sending them into the oncoming traffic and a head-on collision with a semi.
 Josie had a hairline fracture on her collarbone and minor bruising to her liver and intestines. Jessica’s ankle and femur were broken putting her in a large cast and wheelchair.
A LEGION OF HELP FOR THE ANNUAL LOCAL PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK SALE
 If you own a Kindle, Nook or iPad, you may wonder if books face near extinction.
 The ease of downloading a book onto a technological device certainly saves room on the bedside stand. But who can deny the tactile experience of holding a book, turning page after page, reading word for word from start to finish? For those who read digital books – do you feel like you have accomplished something when you see the words “The End”?
 Just like anything, there are people on both camps. But, in reality the physical book just can’t be replaced. Since the invention of the printed word beginning with ancient Egyptian tablets, the printed word has been reproduced in such successive media as clay, wax or wood tablets. Papyrus and tree bark scrolls followed as far back as the Fifth Dynasty and the reign of Nefertiti, about 2400 B.C.
 The first form of a book that modern civilization would recognize is called a codex, which was composed of leaves of uniform size bound on one edge and typically held between two covers made of some more robust material.
WHS MUSICIANS PERFORM ON EUROPEAN TOUR
 Five Winterset high school musicians – Christan Bertelson, Curtis Harryman, Mariah Porter, Amanda Ryner and Elias Van Horn – got the chance to tour Europe for 16 days this past July with the Iowa Ambassadors of Music (IAM).
 As part of a select group of 378 student musicians, advisors and parents from across Iowa, the Winterset High School students opened with four days of pre-tour rehearsals and a farewell concert at Grinnell College.
THE MAKING OF AN HISTORIC DISTRICT: 118 N. 1ST AVE
 From a clap board log cabin to a present-day pharmacy, with some minor controversy just before the turn of the 1900s.
 This week we look to the west side of the downtown square at what is now part of the Montross Pharmacy complex of buildings building at 188 N. 1st Ave., but now 120 N. 1st Ave.
 The clap board log cabin, built in 1849, was considered the “last landmark of the early days in Winterset”. It was sold and relocated in 1898. The log cabin had been used as an express office by Mr. Marvin. The express office was relocated to the corner of John Wayne Drive and Jefferson Street. The log cabin building was sold to Peter Clear, who moved the building in preparation for new construction. The cabin was moved to near the City Park.
 C.A. Cole constructed the building in 1898 for his jewelry shop, and added business offices on the second floor to be used by a law office.
 Construction got off to a rocky start, as heavy rains literally washed away the start of the new building.
MADISON COUNTY VOLUNTEERISM RECOGNIZED
 Long-time community leaders Brenda Hollingsworth and Linda Smith were invited to a statewide event this past weekend about efforts being done in Iowa to preserve history.
 As members of the Madison County Historic Preservation Commission, the pair gave brief presentations on their success recruiting and engaging local volunteerism in the effort to get the downtown business district register on the National Register of Historic Places.
FROM THE ARCHIVES: INCIDENTS OF EARLY TRANSPORTATION IN IOWA
 Some of our roadmaking was unique. We thought Ben Franklin did well when he set up milestones from Phil. to New York, but we surpassed that. When Iowa City was chosen as the capitol, there were no roads leading to it. The site was on a big prairie, on which was one log cabin, a man named Lyman Dillon started from that place with his huge breaking plow drawn by five yoke of oxen, a two horse emigrant wagon, carrying provision, cooking utensils and bedding for the journey following him. For nearly one hundred miles he marked the way to the Mississippi River, the longest furrow on record. There was soon a beaten road beside the furrow, made by the white topped prairie schooners of the coming settlers. The town built up fast, but there was no established mail between the new Capitol and the outside world. Letters and papers were brought form Muscatine by any one who happened there on business. In 1846 a weekly mail was carried on horse-back.
VISUAL TREAT TO START THE DAY
Early morning sunlight streams into Winterset City Park, providing a pleasant surprise to park visitors.
ENCOURAGING DEVELOPMENT
Checking out the lay of the land. A Terracon construction grew takes sample soil borings at the Clark building on the east side of Winterset in preparation for a tentative sale agreement for the building the land. The Clark building has been vacant and for sale for nearly a decade, and a local buyer is now interested. The Clark building is one of two large buildings in the Winterset industrial area that are available for occupancy. Yet another company, a plastics manufacturer, is apparently interested in a portion of the building owned by Farner-Bocken. That pre-purchase agreement is contingent upon adequate fire protection, or in company lingo, “protection against thermal events”. The building sales are further encouragement that the local economy is on the mend, with a fervor. Plans are in the works for a new hotel, a new Hy-Vee food store, a Pizza Ranch and possibly a McDonald’s.
TRAVEL HOST VISITS WINTERSET
 Glenna Finney, Tourism Director for the Madison County Chamber of Commerce spent a Saturday earlier this month giving Stanley Seigel, from the RLTV show “Stanley on the Go” the grand tour of the county. As part of an Iowa tour that included a trip to the Iowa State Fair. Here, Stanley visited the family farm of Bill and Shirley Keating. Here, Stanley’s cameraman records an interview with Bill Keating. A quilt of valor made by Luella Fairholm was presented to Bill Keating and captured in the footage as well. Finney took Siegel to the usual county stops: the romantic Roseman Bridge and nearby Oak Grove Church, Holliwell Bridge, Northside Cafe for a sumptuous meal, and the notorious John Wayne Birthplace. They also visited the Winterset City Park with its Donahoe Bridge and the Cedar Bridge and County Park, complete with the new gazebo built by Madison County Conservation and dedicated to Jerry Schwertfeger. Last on the schedule was a visit to the Madison County Historical Complex, where he was treated to a surprise performance by the Winterset Community Band. According to Heather Riley, Executive Director of the Chamber, “They loved it here and promised to send a tape of the segment when it airs.”